Posted in Carolyn Miller, Reviews

Underestimating Miss Cecilia

A couple of years ago, I was introduced to Carolyn Miller, an author of Christian romantic fiction set in nineteenth century England. I typically don’t enjoy reading romantic fiction just for the sake of reading romantic fiction. I like a romantic component, but I prefer it to be a side story or a vehicle by which something more intriguing (especially history!) is shared. So, while I agreed to review Miller’s novels, I honestly didn’t expect her to become a favorite author. Yet, somehow I kept coming back to her.

I finished her Regency Brides: A Legacy of Grace series and enjoyed all three books. Although I missed her second Regency Brides series (A Promise of Hope), when I had the chance to pick up Underestimating Miss Cecilia, book two in Daughters of Aynsley, the third Regency Brides series, I figured I’d give it a whirl. And I’m glad I did.

Obviously, it’s always dangerous to pick up the second book in a three-book series without having read the first book. But, this particular gamble turned out well. Although there were clear references to the first book, as well as indications that I was missing some details from having not read A Hero for Miss Hatherleigh, I found Underestimating Miss Cecilia to be sufficiently self-contained. The characters were easy to get to know, and the flow of the story carried itself well.

When reading a romantic novel, it goes without saying that the girl gets the boys and vice versa. That is simply the nature of romantic fiction. But, once again, Carolyn Miller artfully weaves the story to keep the reader engaged and interested, even knowing what the end result will be. The how is the key, and Miller handles the how well.

She also includes a treasure that makes this book even more fun for me: history! This particular history includes the struggle for labor and representation reform in England in the first half of the 19th century, revolving around the Peterloo Massacre of 1819. (Yes, I had to look it up!) I enjoy novels that breathe life into history I’m either unaware of or have only seen facts about. How did real people interact with those events? What impact did they have on actual lives? What did the people at the forefront of change experience and sacrifice to see the change come to be? As William Wilberforce gave his time, energy, and even health to the fight to end the slave trade, so did others surrender much to see that common laborers received fair representation in Parliament. Carolyn Miller’s weaving of this portion of history into the fabric of a romance makes for captivating reading.

There is one more aspect of the Regency Brides books that I enjoy. Many historical novels are written such that the characters may be fully in their own time period, but their language more reflects our own. On the one hand, I understand this. Language changes, and authors must choose whether to adhere to the language of the time or write in a way that our modern sensitivities can grasp. I think Carolyn Miller does a good job of bridging that gap. While I do think many of the thought processes reflected in Underestimating Miss Cecilia and the other books in the Regency Brides series more match modern culture than the early 1800s, there are also many references, comments, dialogues, and behaviors that are clearly foreign to us. Little idioms caused me to pause and contemplate. Phrasings caught me off guard. I loved those moments and those little glimpses into how culture grows and changes.

All that to say, for those who enjoy Christian romantic fiction, especially of a British flair, Underestimating Miss Cecilia is definitely a title to check out. And yes, I’d also recommend it to those who like historical fiction and don’t mind it being presented in a strong romantic frame. Overall, I am definitely finding Carolyn Miller to be an enjoyable author when I’m in the mood for a fun, even predictable read while still wanting depth and an element of surprise.

THIS BOOK WAS SENT TO ME BY KREGEL PUBLICATIONS IN EXCHANGE FOR MY HONEST REVIEW.
Posted in Book Recommendations, Reviews

The Final Installment! #TQ4T

Back when my oldest (now 18) was not quite 10, we were just beginning to explore the joys of fantasy and science fiction. Oh, we’d done Narnia, but we were learning that there were more options. A blogger friend had signed on to review a children’s science fiction book, but she realized she wasn’t going to be able to get it reviewed. So, she asked if I’d take over. Since I was constantly on the lookout for new books for my voracious readers, I gladly said yes, and my daughter and I read it together.

Taken by Brock Eastman had us hooked immediately! I wish I’d had a recorder running so I could remember all of the conversation we had about Taken. It was unlike anything we’d read together before. And even though it was written with children in mind, I found myself as engaged in the story as my daughter was.

The setting is a futuristic world where humanity has spread out across the stars and their origin and history has been lost. Elliot and Laura Wikk are archaeologists working to uncover some of that lost history. As the series continues, readers discover just what caused that history to be lost and what has instigated the efforts to regain it, but from the first chapter it is obvious that not all is as it seems. Just as the Wikks are about to head to a new site, Elliot and Laura are captured by a strange man and his soldiers. Their four children are left with a packed spaceship, coordinates for the family’s intended destination, and a compelling need to rescue their parents from this mysterious captain.

It is quickly evident that part of the quest involves a search for something more than just history, and this is where my daughter and I had amazing conversations. As a very young Christian, she was picking up on the hints of what this futuristic humanity had lost: a connection to God and His truth.

The final installment in the five-book The Quest for Truth series, Hope, released July 1. To refresh my memory on the flow of the story, I decided to go back and reread Taken, Risk, Unleash, and Tangle before I picked up Hope. As I reread, I was reminded just how much I enjoyed the story, even as an adult reading children’s books. When I finally finished the first four books and was ready to dive into Hope, I was definitely not disappointed.

There was a lot to pack into this final installment of the series. Mysteries about characters, logistics of the quest, the truth about the ultimate destination, and so much more had to fit within these final pages. Somehow, author Brock Eastman pulled all of that off while still delving into additional character development and incorporating the message of Truth throughout.

It’s hard to say much about Hope specifically without giving away spoilers from the rest of the series. But I will say that it’s worth the ride. It’s worth reading Taken, Risk, Unleash, and Tangle in order to enjoy Hope. This is the type of series that can be enjoyed as a read-aloud with the whole family or handed to children to enjoy on their own. The writing is simple enough for middle elementary students, yet captivating enough for high schoolers–and even the parents! This is a series I will be recommending for years to come.

Thanks, Brock, for the great journey! We look forward to taking more journeys with you in the years to come.

Enjoy the Quest!

Posted in Family, Parenting, Reviews, Tricia Goyer

Calming Angry Kids

I love sharing books. I often have a list of books that I want to keep extras of on hand so I can loan or give them away. But, typically those books fit a targeted audience. Wives. Moms. Young women. Those who love historical fiction or fantasy or some other specific genre. Recently, though, I had the privilege of reading a book that I wanted to share with everyone.

Calming Angry Kids comes from the pen of prolific author Tricia Goyer. But, Calming Angry Kids was not just the next great book idea in a list of many. Instead, this particular endeavor was the result of tears, heartache, and pure determination. It was written with her skill as an author, but the credit goes to an entire family who chose to fight the fight and not give up. They chose to push through until they could see beauty birthed from the victory of overcoming the pure ugliness of anger. As much as I love reading everything that Tricia writes, I can honestly say that none of her books come close to the powerful message of Calming Angry Kids. And it seems others agree. Weeks before its scheduled October 1 release, Tricia shared the news that her book had already entered its third printing!

So, what is so powerful about Calming Angry Kids? Tricia doesn’t just speak from the perspective of a mom who has been there, although that would be a fitting description. She also doesn’t speak only from a clinical voice, although she has read exhaustively enough and interacted with enough professionals on the topic that she probably should be handed a degree! Instead, she combines the two concepts, delving into the psychology behind understanding anger at its very source while simultaneously offering help that is more than just clinical – it works in real life. In fact, it worked in her very real life.

The Goyers’ story is one of adoption and dealing with anger birthed from childhood trauma. It is a powerful story, and one that I know will help equip, strengthen, and encourage many adoptive parents. But, to say that Calming Angry Kids is only useful for adoptive parents – or even only for parents – is short selling the value of this book. This is about relationships. It is about understanding what causes others to behave in hurtful anger. What causes them to push away the very love they so greatly crave. My best friend regularly reminds me that “hurting people hurt people,” and that simple phrase fits beautifully with the message of Calming Angry Kids. When we find ways to work through our immediate emotional responses and choose instead to act out of truth, we can conquer the anger that plagues not only our children and others we come into contact with, but ourselves as well.

Calming Angry Kids is not a be-all, end-all solution to anger issues that plague our homes and our lives. But, it is a resource that shines a light in dark places, sharing tools and resources that will point us in the right direction. It encourages us to keep fighting even when victory seems impossible. It helps us to know that there is no shame in admitting that we need help. And it reminds us that there really is hope, even in a relationship that seems to be consumed by anger.

Yes, Calming Angry Kids is definitely a book I will readily and wholeheartedly recommend, not only to parents but to anyone struggling to find victory in a relationship haunted by anger.

Click here to read chapter one of Calming Angry Kids.

Posted in Reviews

Before We Were Yours

I tend to only review books that are sent to me for that purpose, but the more I read, the more I realize that I want to share about other outstanding titles I enjoy. I primarily want to do that because it will enable me to share more nonfiction (which I rarely agree to review because I read nonfiction much more slowly and don’t want to be rushed for the sake of deadlines). I’ll be starting those nonfiction reviews soon, but for today I have another novel to share.

I can’t remember where I first heard of Before We Were Yours, but some suggestion somewhere along the way led me to put it on reserve at the library. When I reserved it, there were sixteen people in line ahead of me – not surprising considering it spent six months on the New York Times Bestseller list. Fortunately, it was also a book my mom loved, so she bought her own copy and loaned it to me months before I would have gotten it from the library. I can tell you this, though: it would have been worth the wait.

One look at the synopsis reveals very clearly that Before We Were Yours is not a light and fluffy read. On the contrary, it’s quite hard, especially if you tend to start, like I do, by looking at the historical context for a novel such as this. Fiction, no matter how dedicated the author to depicting history, can rarely fully encompass the horror of dark points in our history. And that is the case in the story Lisa Wingate weaves of Rill Foss and her family. Despite the horrors Rill and her siblings endured, many families endured much worse in real life.

Rill’s story is set in the late 1930s and early 1940s during the days of Georgia Tann, a woman who “rescued” poor children from their bleak circumstances and matched them to wealthy families who desired children, usually for a hefty price. Some of the children were rightfully removed from their families by the state, victims of abuse and neglect. But others were literally stolen from happy, loving families whose only crime was poverty.

Decades later, a chance encounter leaves another young woman, Avery Stafford, stumped. An elderly woman she’s never met claims to know Avery’s beloved grandmother. Avery knows she should simply leave the question alone, but the woman’s cryptic statements, combined with her own grandmother’s failing memory and odd responses, spark her curiosity. Even more disconcerting is the fear that the connection between the two women may hide a scandal that could destroy her family’s political and societal standing. Determined to uncover the truth, Avery embarks on a journey that will change her life in more ways than one.

Before We Were Yours is the type of historical fiction I love – a glimpse into the side of history that never makes its way into the history books. Lisa Wingate explores both the immediate and long-term impact of historical events, while also building a beautiful tale of relationship and family. She combines the treat of being able to read a beautiful open-and-closed storyline with the reality that no life can truly fit within the beginnings and endings of a satisfying novel. The story also reminds us that hope and joy can be found even in the darkest of places. Even though the spiritual aspect of that reality is not really explored in Before We Were Yours, it is not difficult for believers to see how God’s hand was present even in the darkness that encompassed so many families during Georgia Tann’s decades of power. Yes, it’s a hard read, but it is also a worthwhile read.

I definitely recommend this book for adults and for older, mature teens.

Posted in Elizabeth Camden, Reviews

A Daring Venture

I recently glanced through all of my Elizabeth Camden books, remembering the plot of this one or a favorite character from that one. As I compared older books to her latest, I realized why I still do not hesitate to get my hands on each new release. Even though she releases at least one new title – if not two – every year, and even though her writing style and character development have morphed and changed over the years, there has never been a change in the quality of her research, creativity, and quality. Camden’s most recent effort, A Daring Venture, is just as captivating, and her characters are just as rich as ever.

A Daring Venture is unique in Camden’s ventures, however, in that it is a genuine sequel. Although once before Camden has taken a minor character from one book and turned him into a major character in another, nothing in those two books demands that they be read together. A Daring Venture holds its own as far as the story line is concerned, but readers will miss a great deal if they do not first get to know Nicholas Drake’s background through his sister’s story in A Dangerous Legacy.

(Note: This review, by nature, will contain some spoilers for those who have not yet read A Dangerous Legacy.)

Nicholas Drake’s inheritance from his estranged uncle has brought him fortune, but not automatically fame. Despite having vast resources, Nick must still fight a battle for recognition and acceptance among not only the wealthy, but also the political leaders in New York. He is convinced that being named Commissioner of Water for New York will allow him to earn the respect he needs to take care of the growing city, but he has no illusions that it will be an easy task. What he doesn’t expect, however, is the continued family tension that he cannot seem to escape – or that his new role might force him to sacrifice his heart.

Rosalind Werner’s world crashed around her early in life when a deadly cholera outbreak attacked her family. Now an adult, Rosalind has learned that impure water is not her only enemy. Educated as a research doctor in a time when women are not recognized as competent in the scientific arena, Rosalind must not only defend her qualifications, but also her controversial research findings – and even her personal reputation. But she never imagines the fullness of what it will cost her to stand and defend what she knows to be true.

I love the combination of flaws and strengths in Nick, Rosalind, and even familiar characters Lucy and Colin. The relational interactions are vivid and powerful, battling real temptations and struggles. A Daring Venture is not a neatly packaged, every-problem-solved romance. Yet it is satisfying and beautiful at the same time. Camden has beautifully handled the transition from single-story writing to weaving a series, and I felt that the character development from the first novel to the second was well-handled and strongly presented. And, of course, the history reminded me once again why I devour Elizabeth Camden’s novels. The story line explored an aspect of history vitally relevant to each and every one of us, yet one we take for granted and do not truly even think about. I love diving into these historical glimpses, and I love the way they urge me to research on my own. Camden does a great job of merging fictional and historical characters and exploring the impact events and decisions made on real people.

Elizabeth Camden continues to succeed, providing my teen daughters and I yet another book to read and reread. And, the story isn’t over yet! I am already counting down to next year’s release of book three, A Desperate Hope!

This book was sent to me by Bethany House Publishers in exchange for my honest review.
Posted in Reviews

A Most Noble Heir

We all think we love – and would love to live – a good “rags to riches” story. But the reality of rising from one social context to another never runs as smoothly as the glorious fairy tales like to reflect. The struggle, rather than the fairy tale, is what is reflected in Susan Anne Mason’s A Most Noble Heir.

Nolan Price is perfectly at home in the stables, caring for the Earl of Stainsby’s horses. But Nolan’s real passion is for a place of his own with his beloved Hannah Burnham by his side. Just as those plans are coming together, however, his mother’s deathbed confession destroys every hope in an instant. Nolan is the earl’s son and rightful heir. His place is no longer in the stables but in the earl’s home, living as befits his station. Nolan wants none of it, and he is determined to move forward with his own plans. The earl, however, has no intention of letting Nolan go – and he has the power and authority to ensure his will is enforced, no matter the cost.

As can be imagined, the interactions and relational dynamics of A Most Noble Heir are intense. Every relationship Nolan holds dear is stretched and strained, and the one relationship he never had but truly wanted has now been forced upon him in a most undesirable way. At the risk of spoiling the story a bit, I must confess that Nolan’s reactions to his life upheaval left me preferring every other character – even the earl himself! – over Nolan. I wanted him to be, well, noble. I wanted to see what it was about this man that made Hannah fall in love with him. Looking back, though, I realize that what I wanted was fluffy idealism. The picture Mason has painted in A Most Noble Heir is a realistic one, depicting a young man with good character but an untried heart. His life, while encumbered with the challenges of servitude and relatively low station, has not truly been stretched. The sudden upheaval of everything he held dear stretches and strains him, revealing flaws that need purification and youth that needs maturation. Although I still find myself drawn more solidly toward other characters in the book, I see that Nolan is much more the picture of the noble heir than I initially believed him to be.

So, where does that leave the book as a whole? Despite the potentially heavy subject matter of A Most Noble Heir, this is a quick and easy read, full of sweet moments and even a touch of humor. Being married to a church history nerd, I did notice that a more modern concept of faith was incorporated into the narrative. While it will seem very fitting to contemporary readers, it is not an accurate historical depiction of what Christianity would have looked like, even for those with a solid and intimate relationship with the Lord. This does not distract from the story itself – it is simply a reminder that our appetite for both history and theology may be whetted by fiction, but we can never be content to allow fiction to be our main course in either discipline.

The storyline moves along at a good pace, and a small thread of mystery weaves its way throughout the narrative, leaving the reader wondering what other forces are working behind the scenes. Lessons are learned, character is developed, and a few surprises are worked in along the way. All in all, A Most Noble Heir is a fun read for lovers of late 19th century historical fiction.

This book was sent to me by Bethany House Publishers in exchange for my honest review.
Posted in Reviews

Keturah

Time flies when you’re reading good books! And I’ve read several great ones lately – and lost track of a couple of review due dates. So, since I have one review that’s a bit late and another that’s due now, you get two this week!

The first one is the latest historical fiction from wonderful storyteller Lisa Tawn Bergren. I was first introduced to her books through the God Gave Us children’s picture book series. Several years later, I was introduced to her adult fiction when I devoured her Grand Tour series. Then came her young adult River of Time series, followed by other books from each genre. The most recent delight from her writing desk is Keturah, book one in The Sugar Baron’s Daughter series.

For years, the widowed Lady Keturah Banning Tomlinson’s father has told his daughters again and again that the family sugar plantation in the West Indies is not the appropriate place for young women. But word of her father’s death is accompanied by word of dire financial issues, Keturah makes the decision that flies in the face of all societal convention: she is going to the West Indies to try to save not only the plantation but also her sisters’ inheritance back home in England. Unwilling to either be left behind or see their sister travel alone to Nevis, Keturah’s two sisters make the decision to travel with her. Challenges begin for the sisters almost immediately as they learn what it means for women to try to live and work in a culture dominated by men – white men.

Keturah offers everything I love about historical fiction. It is rich in exploration of the culture in which the story is set. That means the good and the bad, including a look at slavery. But that is not the only challenging topic Bergren deals with in Keturah. At the risk of introducing spoilers, our widowed heroine does not look back upon her short marriage fondly. Instead, she still bears the scars of the horror she silently and secretly endured as a young bride.

Because of this, I am a little more limited in my recommendation of this book than I might be with others this wonderful author. That doesn’t mean I don’t highly recommend it! It just means that I’ll only share it with my daughters as I know they are of an appropriate age to handle the material, and I will be careful to give warning to friends who still bear the scars of their own abuse experiences.

Well-written, well researched, and beautifully told, Keturah is a captivating introduction to The Sugar Baron’s Daughter series. I greatly anticipate the continuation!

This book was sent to me by Bethany House Publishers in exchange for my honest review.